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April 2017

Astrology and Reformation: Book Discussion with Robin B. Barnes

Wednesday, April 26 @ 12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

CMEMS workshop with Robin Barnes (Davidson College). Sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, the Program in the History and Philosophy of Science, and the Department of Religious Studies. Stanford affiliates are invited to join us for lunch and discussion. Robin Barnes is Professor of History emeritus at Davidson College. His research focuses on the cultural history of early modern Europe, and particularly on apocalypticism, prophecy, and astrology in Germany. He is the author of Prophecy and Gnosis:…

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Religious Studies Majors present on senior research at ASURPS

Saturday, April 29 @ 9:00 am - 11:00 am

Julian Pena (Religious Studies, ’17) and Itai Fahri (Religious Studies & Philosophy, ’17) will present posters of their senior research projects at the Symposium of Undergraduate Research and Public Service. Free and open to the public.

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May 2017

Apocalypse, Again: Vernacular and Repetition in a Qur’anic Imitation

Thursday, May 11 @ 12:00 pm - 1:20 pm

Colloquium with Will Sherman, PhD student in Religious Studies. For Religious Studies and Islamic Studies faculty, graduate students, and Stanford-affiliated guests. RSVP from your stanford.edu email address to Sarah Brabeck. Along the Indo-Afghan frontier in the 16th century, a Sufi movement known as the Roshaniyya (“the people of light”) encountered a problem familiar to many messianic-apocalyptic movements: how does one write apocalyptically? How can a text move beyond descriptions about the apocalypse and instead beccome the apocalypse through the written…

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Nostalgia for the Future: Poetics of Occultation

Thursday, May 25 @ 12:00 pm - 1:20 pm

Colloquium with Ahoo Najafian, PhD student in Religious Studies. For Religious Studies faculty, graduate students, and Stanford-affiliated guests. This paper looks at appropriations of the 14th-century poet Hafez in the 20th-century Iran as the voice of mystical Shi’ism.

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